Item #10688 1936 Official Publication National Air Races Los Angeles Municipal Airport, Los Angeles September 4, 5, 6, 7. 16th Annual World's Premier Air Classic. Phillip T. Henderson Los Angeles Junior Chamber of Commerce . - Clifford W. Henderson, Sponsored by, Management.
1936 Official Publication National Air Races Los Angeles Municipal Airport, Los Angeles September 4, 5, 6, 7. 16th Annual World's Premier Air Classic
1936 Official Publication National Air Races Los Angeles Municipal Airport, Los Angeles September 4, 5, 6, 7. 16th Annual World's Premier Air Classic
Los Angeles Junior Chamber of Commerce (Sponsored by). - Clifford W. Henderson, Phillip T. Henderson (Management)

1936 Official Publication National Air Races Los Angeles Municipal Airport, Los Angeles September 4, 5, 6, 7. 16th Annual World's Premier Air Classic

Los Angeles: 1936. Folio, pp. 56, illustrations, advertisements, full page Coca-Cola ad in color on the inside back cover. Nice art deco front cover. Separate sheet "Today's Racing Entries, Friday, September Fourth, laid in loose. -- No notable defects. -- Overall Condition. Near fine. Item #10688

"The National Air Races (also known as Pulitzer Trophy Races) are a series of pylon and cross-country races that have taken place in the United States since 1920. The science of aviation, and the speed and reliability of aircraft and engines grew rapidly during this period; the National Air Races were both a proving ground and showcase for this. -- In 1920, publisher Ralph Pulitzer sponsored the Pulitzer Trophy Race and the Pulitzer Speed Trophy for military airplanes at Roosevelt Field, Long Island, New York, in an effort to publicize aviation and his newspaper. The races eventually moved to Cleveland, in 1929, where they were known as the Cleveland National Air Races.[2] They drew the best flyers of the time, including James Doolittle, Wiley Post, Tex Rankin, Frank Hawks, Jimmy Wedell, Roscoe Turner, and others from the pioneer age of aviation. These air races helped to inspire Donald Blakeslee as a young boy. Other races included in the U.S. National Air Races were the Mitchell Trophy Race, the Town & Country Club Race for civilians, the Kansas City Rotary Club Trophy "for all three military services," and the Glenn Curtiss Trophy Race for "biplanes with engines having less than 510 cubic inches. Starting in 1929, the races usually ran for up to 10 days, usually from late August to early September to include Labor Day. Aviation promoter Cliff Henderson was managing director of the National Air Races from 1928 to 1939. During World War II the races were on hiatus. The races included a variety of events, including cross-country races originating in Portland, Oakland, and Los Angeles, with a final destination in Cleveland.[4]: 79–81 Also included were landing contests, glider demonstrations, airship flights, and parachute-jumping contests. The more popular events were the Thompson Trophy Races which started in 1929; a closed-course race where aviators raced their planes around pylons; and the Bendix Trophy Race, the "transcontinental air race," across most of the USA starting in 1931. In 1929, a Santa Monica, California to Cleveland, Ohio route was started for the Women's Air Derby (nicknamed the "Powder Puff Derby"), featuring well-known female pilots such as Amelia Earhart, Pancho Barnes, Bobbi Trout, and Louise Thaden. Thaden was the winner in the heavy Class D (engines with 510–810 cubic inches (8,400–13,300 cm3)), while Phoebe Omlie won the light Class C (engines with 275–510 cubic inches (4,510–8,360 cm3)). This was also the year for the first female pylon race, the winner of which was awarded the Aerol Trophy beginning in 1931".-wikipedia.

Price: $350.00